Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science - Materials Science

Materials Science Research Lecture

Wednesday February 12, 2020 4:00 PM

A safari through thousands of 2D materials guided by data science

Speaker: Evan Reed, Stanford University
Location: Spalding Laboratory 106 (Hartley Memorial Seminar Room)

Abstract:

Two-dimensional materials and weakly bonded layered materials exhibit potentially advantageous properties as thin electronic materials, but research has been largely focused on only a few dozen types. We have utilized data mining approaches to elucidate over 1500 2D materials and several hundred 3D materials consisting of van der Waals bonded 1D subcomponents, or molecular wires. I will provide a guided tour of the spectrum of properties of these materials that are of interest for electronic and other applications, including piezoelectric and structural phase change properties.

A grand challenge problem in materials science is the ability to predict the synthesizability and stability of materials, a challenge that traditional modeling approaches are largely insufficient to accomplish. I will describe our efforts to combine our data set with physics-based machine learning to reveal the chemical composition of an additional 1000 materials that are likely to exhibit layered and two-dimensional phases but have yet to be synthesized. We find our model performs five times better than practitioners in the field at predicting layered materials and is comparable or better than professional solid-state chemists. I will attempt a sober eyed outlook on the potential for data science to have impact on electronic materials, electrochemical, and other materials spaces.

More about the Speaker:

Evan Reed is a faculty member in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford University. He received a B.S. in applied physics from Caltech (1998) and PhD. in physics from MIT (2003). In 2004, he was an E. O. Lawrence Fellow and staff scientist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory before moving to Stanford in 2010. Evan Reed's recent work focuses on theory and modeling of low dimensional materials, statistical learning for materials synthesis and energy storage applications, structural phase changes, and high pressure shock wave compression. He is the Charles Lee Powell faculty scholar in the School of Engineering. He has been a Robert Noyce Faculty Scholar within the Stanford University School of Engineering and a recipient of the DARPA Young Faculty Award, NSF CAREER Award, and Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Program (YIP) Award.

Series Materials Research Lecture Series

Contact: Elizabeth Rodriguez at 626-395-3329 elizabeth@caltech.edu